Our Taste of History: call for volunteers September 8 and 9, 2012

Tonight (Monday, Oct 10th 7pm) FREE FILM and discussion: join others who care about our kids’ lunch food

Locally grown watermelon, apples and peaches are on the menu at  FCPSWHEN: Monday evening, October 10th at 7pm

WHERE: Maryland Ensemble Theater, 31 W. Patrick , downtown Frederick (basement theater of the FSK Hotel)

WHAT: FREE documentary film Two Angry Moms followed by Judith Gordon, FCPS Farm-to-School Program director.

In the documentary film Two Angry Moms, a pair of mothers team up in a movement to change the way American children eat in school cafeterias and fight for quality nutrition in our school system. (Length: 60 min.)

Judith Gordon, Frederick County’s director for the public school Farm-to-School Program, works to put nutritious and local foods on our kids’ lunch plates. Come to learn more about what she’s doing. Judith will lead our post-film discussion.

refreshments available

Not worried about school lunches? Pass it on to someone you know who might be. Thanks.

 

Organic agriculture grant opportunity, deadline 3-4-2011

National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition

The deadline to apply for the exciting and evolving Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Organic Initiative is coming up fast. USDA has allocated $50 million for the Organic Initiative in 2011, which is available for all three of the following: certified organic growers, those transitioning to organic farming systems, and farmers exempt from formal certification.

**NEW** Frederick Farmers Market downtown Frederick

Frederick Farmers Market

Wednesdays, 3pm in the old Carmack Jay’s parking lot, between 3rd and 4th streets on Market St. Cut flowers, berries, vegetables, herbs, fruit, beef, pork, eggs, baked goods, lamb, rabbit, wool, yarn, chocolates, and hand made knits.

All items raised, grown or made within 120 miles of Frederick.

Urbana Farmers Market Open Sundays through October 12-3pm

Live acoustic music, a barbeque vendor and lots of local items – every Sunday

Conventional and organic produce, eggs, baked goods, specialty baked goods

(gluten and dairy-free with some vegan options), plants and fresh cut

flowers, local crafts and so much more!

Bring home dinner and food for the week at one location!

For questions or about vending, contact Beth Johnson at 301-712-4137

Maryland Assembly Supports Agricultural Growth, Buy Local and Waterway Protection

Read about it in Food Safety News.

BY DAN FLYNN | MAY 12, 2010

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/05/cleaner-water-goal-of-nutrient-trading/

Production Needed to Meet Local Food Demand in Frederick County

At the March 2010 IMAGINE! Frederick showing of Fresh Colby Ferguson, Frederick County’s Agricultural Specialist with the Office of Economic Development, shared this information with us:    Frederick_County_Ag_statistics_consumption_vs._production[1]

Concern about your food? Act Now!

Dear Friends of Frederick County,

We have just a few days to stop the United States government from preventing the world from properly labeling genetically modified foods (GMOs).

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have adopted a pro-corporate position that laughably claims labeling GM/GE foods creates the “false” impression that “that the labeled food is in some way different from other foods.”

And next week, at the United Nations meeting in Canada, they will tell the world to adopt the same position, preventing other countries from rightly labeling GMOs as different from fresh, natural food. The implications of this position could further undermine organic food standards all over the world, especially organic labeling.

We know that GMO food created by the likes of Monsanto is not only “different” but unhealthy and unsustainable. Can you help us tell the USDA and FDA to wake up and drop this ridiculous position?

Click here to tell the USDA and FDA: the world should be free to label GMO foods as such.

While the rest of the world wants to be able to label unnatural GMOs, Barack Obama’s USDA and FDA have adopted pro-corporate food positions GMOs. Unless we act now, the United States will go to this meeting telling the world that GMO foods are not different and should not be labeled.

GMO foods, by definition, are genetically different. By altering nature’s design in order to withstand a barrage of chemicals and other poisons, humans are without question creating a new, different kind of food.

We need to tell the USDA and FDA to abandon its wrongheaded, corporate food position that GMOs are the same as non-GMO foods. Sign our petition now before the deadline on Monday.

Thank you for your support on this urgent petition – please share this with anyone you know who cares about their food.

Best,

Lisa Madison

Distribution & Outreach Coordinator

FRESH

On 40th anniversary of Earth Day, local leaders look ahead

 
 
 
Title here

The view from Braddock Heights is a popular touchstone for lifelong Frederick Country residents when they think of the changes the area has undergone since the first Earth Day.”All you could see was barge traffic and church steeples,” recalled County Commissioner John L. Thompson Jr. “I often picture myself as a 7- or 8-year-old child looking over there, and then as a 50-year-old elected official looking down at all that development now.”

Since Frederick celebrated the first Earth Day 40 years ago, sprawl may be the most visible change, but it’s not the only one. Here’s what local environmental leaders peg as top environmental issues for the region today:

Land preservation

Forest and well-managed agricultural land doesn’t just make for scenic landscape. They also store global warming-causing carbon dioxide, provide vital habitat for plants and animals, and serve as a filter for the water supply.

“Preserving forests is one of the most protective things we can do with our land in the Chesapeake Bay region,” said Steve Bunker, who directs preservation for The Nature Conservancy in Maryland.

Invasive species

As people have become much more mobile, we haven’t traveled alone — we’ve brought an array of plants and animals with us. Seeds and insects can hitch a ride on hiking boots, sailboats or tire treads, traveling hundreds or even thousands of miles to habitats that are totally unprotected from the strange, new invaders.

“We’re literally getting overrun,” said Mel Poole, who oversees Catoctin Mountain Park.

One of the species Poole has an especially close eye on is hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect native to Asia and western North America that is decimating eastern trees that lack natural resistance. Hemlocks are particularly important because they provide shade along streams.

Local economy

Building a strong local economy doesn’t just preserve local jobs, it also reduces the amount of fuel used to ship goods around the world.

“In the next 40 years, I’d like to see a vibrant local economy based on local production,” said Janice Wiles, director of Friends of Frederick County. “It would minimize transport costs and would mean connecting with your local food system by eating what’s locally available.”

Green building

Improving energy efficiency is one of the simplest ways of reducing global warming pollution. Building homes and offices with energy-efficient appliances can lock in savings for years to come.

“It really matters when you’re talking about construction of homes and businesses,” said Hilari Varnadore, director of the county’s Office of Sustainability.

The nature experience

Environmental awareness has grown by orders of magnitude since 1970, and the younger generation leads the way in many respects. For instance, children are often the most dedicated recyclers. But Poole still worries about the next generation’s environmental ethos.

“Look at the rates of childhood obesity,” he said. “We think, plain and simple, it’s that our kids don’t get outdoors and have regular nonstructured play.”

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The Frederick News-Post Privacy Policy. Use of this site indicates your agreement to our Terms of Service. On 40th anniversary of Earth Day, local leaders look ahead

Originally published April 22, 2010

By Annie Snider

The view from Braddock Heights is a popular touchstone for lifelong Frederick Country residents when they think of the changes the area has undergone since the first Earth Day.

“All you could see was barge traffic and church steeples,” recalled County Commissioner John L. Thompson Jr. “I often picture myself as a 7- or 8-year-old child looking over there, and then as a 50-year-old elected official looking down at all that development now.”

Since Frederick celebrated the first Earth Day 40 years ago, sprawl may be the most visible change, but it’s not the only one. Here’s what local environmental leaders peg as top environmental issues for the region today:

Land preservation

Forest and well-managed agricultural land doesn’t just make for scenic landscape. They also store global warming-causing carbon dioxide, provide vital habitat for plants and animals, and serve as a filter for the water supply.

“Preserving forests is one of the most protective things we can do with our land in the Chesapeake Bay region,” said Steve Bunker, who directs preservation for The Nature Conservancy in Maryland.

Invasive species

As people have become much more mobile, we haven’t traveled alone — we’ve brought an array of plants and animals with us. Seeds and insects can hitch a ride on hiking boots, sailboats or tire treads, traveling hundreds or even thousands of miles to habitats that are totally unprotected from the strange, new invaders.

“We’re literally getting overrun,” said Mel Poole, who oversees Catoctin Mountain Park.

One of the species Poole has an especially close eye on is hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect native to Asia and western North America that is decimating eastern trees that lack natural resistance. Hemlocks are particularly important because they provide shade along streams.

Local economy

Building a strong local economy doesn’t just preserve local jobs, it also reduces the amount of fuel used to ship goods around the world.

“In the next 40 years, I’d like to see a vibrant local economy based on local production,” said Janice Wiles, director of Friends of Frederick County. “It would minimize transport costs and would mean connecting with your local food system by eating what’s locally available.”

Green building

Improving energy efficiency is one of the simplest ways of reducing global warming pollution. Building homes and offices with energy-efficient appliances can lock in savings for years to come.

“It really matters when you’re talking about construction of homes and businesses,” said Hilari Varnadore, director of the county’s Office of Sustainability.

The nature experience

Environmental awareness has grown by orders of magnitude since 1970, and the younger generation leads the way in many respects. For instance, children are often the most dedicated recyclers. But Poole still worries about the next generation’s environmental ethos.

“Look at the rates of childhood obesity,” he said. “We think, plain and simple, it’s that our kids don’t get outdoors and have regular nonstructured play.”

by Annie Snider

http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sections/news/display.htm?StoryID=103998

31 Ways Citizens Can Help Our Economy in Frederick County

http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/local-economies-close-the-distance-between-us