Shad restoration in the Potomac River: an economic resource and ecological experiment

Restoration of the American Shad in the Potomac River Mr. James Cummins, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (This text is a summary of Mr. Cummin’s presentation at Hood College Symposium, March 7, 2013) The American Shad is the world’s largest herring.  It spends most of its life along the Atlantic coastline, ranging from […]

Urban forestry – an important component to protecting the Chesapeake Bay

Urban Forestry: An Increasingly Critical Component of the Landscape Mr. Michael Galvin, SavATree (This text is a summary of Mr. Galvin’s presentation at Hood College Symposium, March 7, 2013) Current decisions are being made at a local, land parcel level.  When only one person cuts down a tree, this doesn’t make a huge difference.  However, […]

Will climate change impact the Potomac watershed?

Future Climate Change in the Potomac Watershed Bart Merrick, NOAA Chesapeake Bay (This text is a summary of Mr. Merrick’s presentation at Hood College Symposium, March 7, 2013) Mr. Merrick outlined the models and factors that have contributed to the conclusion that climate scientists have come to: there is a warming climate trend.  These factors […]

3/12/13 A vital player in the bay ecosystem, the American Shad is in need of restoration

Hood College Potomac Watershed Symposium panelist Mr. James Cummins, Interstate Commission of the Potomac River Basin (Director of Living Resources) Restoration of the American Shad in the Potomac River This fish really gets around! The American Shad is an a species of herring that winters in the Florida/Georgia area, summers of the coast of eastern Canada, and […]

3/12/13 How planting trees can protect our water

Hood College Potomac Watershed Symposium panelist Mr. Michael Galvin, SavATree Consulting Group (Director) Urban Forestry: An Increasingly Critical Component of the Landscape The Chesapeake Bay watershed is unique in that a large area, including most of Maryland, northern Virginia, as well as parts of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, and Delaware, drains into a single water source. As […]

3/12/13 Influx of abnormal intersex fish linked to agriculture.

Hood College Potomac Watershed Symposium panelist Dr. Vicki Balzer, USGS National Fish Health Research Laboratory (Fish Pathologist) Endocrine Disruptors in the Potomac Watershed There is a very high prevalence of intersex fish, or fish with both male and female sex organs, in Maryland and Virginia (much more than in West Virginia and Pennsylvania). The culprit […]

3/12/13 Toxic contaminants in fish on your dinner plate

Hood College Potomac Watershed Symposium panelist Dr. Fred Pinkney, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Senior Biologist) Toxic Contaminants in Sediments and Fish Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a long-lasting carcinogen that can both be harmful to fish and the people that consume them, making the pollutant a public health risk. The most apparent issue involving PCBs is […]

3/12/13 With a rainbow of toxic algae, will climate change paint a ‘new’ Potomac River?

Hood Potomac Watershed Symposium Panelist Dr. Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium (Executive Director) Will climate change create a ‘new’ Potomac River in the foreseeable future? Because of climate change, summer droughts interrupted by major storms, along with wetter winters and springs are predicted for the Potomac watershed. In addition, increased temperatures result in low flow […]