Citizens lose again in taxpayers v BOCC: Frederick City drinking water soon to be dirtier

Lake Linganore is the major drinking water source for Frederick City residents.

Based upon a preliminary assessment it is clear that there are highly erodible soils and steep slopes adjacent to the streams and water bodies in the Linganore at Eaglehead PUD.   Clearing the land for development exacerbates sediment runoff into Lake Linganore and the little tributaries that feed it.   Since Lake Linganore is already experiencing a significant sedimentation problem, allowing development  on these soils will make a serious problem even worse.

 MAP linganore steep slopes erodible soils

 

 

 

 

Methodology for Identifying Highly Erodible Soils and Steep Slopes in the Lake Linganore at Eaglehead PUD

 

Soils based on National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Survey [1] within the Lake Linganore at Eaglehead PUD (as revised 5/17/13) identified as being highly erodible are presented.

 

The most thorough discussion of soil erodibility is in Baltimore County’s  “A Methodology for Evaluating Steep Slopes and Erodible Soils Adjacent to Watercourses and Wetlands”[2].   “The ‘High’, ‘Medium’, and ‘Low’ values were assigned to each Map Unit Symbol (MUSYM) in place of K factor values to aid users of this document in determining which soil erodibility scores to use.  ‘High’ erodibility is determined based on the narrative ratings for various MUSYM’s.  The Web Soil Survey contains a multitude of K factor values for each soil map unit.  All of these values were taken into consideration when assigning the ‘High”, ‘Medium’, and ‘Low’ values in Appendix A” (Baltimore County).    If the soil is not listed in the Baltimore County Appendix A, then a Kf or Kw factor of 0.32 or greater is considered highly erodible. Steep slopes were identified by overlaying the NRI/FSD prepared in September 2007 and tracing the slopes identified as greater than 15% (spot checked and revised using 10’ County contours). These areas are identified by legend symbol on the attached concept plan.

 


[1] Soil Survey Staff, Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Web Soil Survey. Available online athttp://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/. Accessed [12/18/2013].
[2] Baltimore County, “A Methodology for Evaluating Steep Slopes and Erodible Soils Adjacent to Watercourses and Wetlands” http://resources.baltimorecountymd.gov/Documents/Environment/eir/steepslopeerodiblesoilsevaluation.pdf (accessed 12/18/2013)