CEDS News Service: an opportunity to address storm water pollution and management

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Are Coops a way to resolve the stormwater BMP maintenance crisis and to allow Watershed Groups to quickly reduce stormwater pollution?

Read about this and more by following the CEDS News Service.

Citizens lose again in taxpayers v BOCC: Frederick City drinking water soon to be dirtier

Lake Linganore is the major drinking water source for Frederick City residents.

Based upon a preliminary assessment it is clear that there are highly erodible soils and steep slopes adjacent to the streams and water bodies in the Linganore at Eaglehead PUD.   Clearing the land for development exacerbates sediment runoff into Lake Linganore and the little tributaries that feed it.   Since Lake Linganore is already experiencing a significant sedimentation problem, allowing development  on these soils will make a serious problem even worse.

 MAP linganore steep slopes erodible soils

 

 

 

 

Methodology for Identifying Highly Erodible Soils and Steep Slopes in the Lake Linganore at Eaglehead PUD

 

Soils based on National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Survey [1] within the Lake Linganore at Eaglehead PUD (as revised 5/17/13) identified as being highly erodible are presented.

 

The most thorough discussion of soil erodibility is in Baltimore County’s  “A Methodology for Evaluating Steep Slopes and Erodible Soils Adjacent to Watercourses and Wetlands”[2].   “The ‘High’, ‘Medium’, and ‘Low’ values were assigned to each Map Unit Symbol (MUSYM) in place of K factor values to aid users of this document in determining which soil erodibility scores to use.  ‘High’ erodibility is determined based on the narrative ratings for various MUSYM’s.  The Web Soil Survey contains a multitude of K factor values for each soil map unit.  All of these values were taken into consideration when assigning the ‘High”, ‘Medium’, and ‘Low’ values in Appendix A” (Baltimore County).    If the soil is not listed in the Baltimore County Appendix A, then a Kf or Kw factor of 0.32 or greater is considered highly erodible. Steep slopes were identified by overlaying the NRI/FSD prepared in September 2007 and tracing the slopes identified as greater than 15% (spot checked and revised using 10’ County contours). These areas are identified by legend symbol on the attached concept plan.

 


[1] Soil Survey Staff, Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Web Soil Survey. Available online athttp://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/. Accessed [12/18/2013].
[2] Baltimore County, “A Methodology for Evaluating Steep Slopes and Erodible Soils Adjacent to Watercourses and Wetlands” http://resources.baltimorecountymd.gov/Documents/Environment/eir/steepslopeerodiblesoilsevaluation.pdf (accessed 12/18/2013) 

Construction causing soil to flow into a stream? what to do!

Here are some resources to help you:

- A YouTube video of a workshop presented a month or so ago by Richard Klein of Community & Environmental Defense Services about the big six watershed pollution sources (construction, storm water, new development, pasture, cropland, point sources) and how citizen organizations can tackle them: http://youtu.be/mmERdOw0kCk
- Potomac Riverkeeper’s Get the Dirt Out project: http://potomacriverkeeper.org/get-dirt-out
- To report sediment control problems in Frederick County (Rick Masser): 301 600 3507
Jefferson Tech Park ground breaking

Jefferson Tech Park ground breaking

Keep your eye open to the Jefferson Tech Park construction.  The workers are in close proximity to a stream flowing through the property.  Read more about the development:  - The Frederick Gorilla Magazine article by Katherine Heerbrandt on the boondoggle that is the development of the Jefferson Tech Park: http://www.frederickgorilla.com/sweet-deal-or-foul-play

CLEANWATER_LINGANORE, Inc forms to put stream health in Linganore on red alert!

Email the group at info@cleanwater-linganore.org

FINAL CLEANWATER_LINGANORE (1)

 

FINAL CLEANWATER_LINGANORE (2)

9/5/13 LTE: Environmental Good Stewardship

Environmental good citizenship

Posted: Thursday, September 5, 2013 2:00 am

While Farrell Keough makes some good points on environmental decision-making authority in his Aug. 19 letter to the editor, I would add that the general public can also contribute to making our environment cleaner and healthier.

Recently I learned about a Friends of Frederick County project that engages citizens to take a look at streams and their condition (where visible, from public roads); if there is a problem with the stream such as trash, an erosive hillside, farming up to the stream bank or cows in the creek, the individual snaps a photo and sends it in.  Read the rest.

Register NOW to adopt a grid – 4 hours/year of volunteer time ONLY

DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM HERE!

It’s easy, it’s fun, it’s relaxing and only requires 4 hours of your time each year.  Moreover the help you give IS SO VERY IMPORTANT to collective efforts of many people and organizations working to help clean up our waters in Frederick County.

There is cause for concern about our streams’ health in Frederick County.  You can help change that.  Please start now.

Read more.  REGISTER NOW!

Thank you.

FNP: New Partners in County Stream Improvement

New partners in county stream improvement

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New partners in county stream improvement

For The Frederick News-Post | Posted: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 2:00 am

John Smucker recently partnered with the Potomac Conservancy as part of a project to remove a fish barrier, an outmoded dam and control bank erosion in Tuscarora Creek. He planted 55 native hardwood trees along with cocoa matts. Brook Hill United Methodist Church helped complete the field and leg work.

Ray Locke, coordinator of the Friends of Frederick County Clean Streams Initiative, is seeking to use similar techniques to improve the health of other streams in Frederick County. Frederick County has 20 different watersheds of which 11 are in poor condition. He is looking for groups to Adopt-A-Grid and install erosion stabilizers to improve water quality.  Read the full story.

Email:  friends@friendsoffrederickcounty or ray_locke@hotmail.com to adopt a grid.

8/24/13 FNP: New Market reconsiders annexation plans

 

New Market reconsiders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read entire article here.

Stormwater audit exposes the importance of inspectors and clean water enforcement!

 A June 7, 2013 email note from Richard Klein, Community and Environmental Defense Services

An October, 2011 Audit of the Severn River watershed revealed that hundreds of stormwater ponds and other practices had failed due to a lack of maintenance.  The Audit then uncovered the cause – a 2001 decision by Anne Arundel County to severely cut-back stormwater staff from seven inspectors to one! 

As a result of diminished inspections little maintenance has been performed and stormwater benefits steadily declined.  In the Severn River watershed alone the stormwater failures have allowed 25,000 pounds of nutrients to needlessly enter the waterway each year.  In fact, funding stormwater inspection programs is THE most cost-effective use of public dollars to minimize stormwater pollution releases into our waterways.

Since the 2011 Audit was released it has served to greatly expand public awareness of the importance of clean water law enforcement.  Nothing illustrates this better than the recent announcement that the County will quadruple their stormwater inspection staff.

 

Watershed Audit Quickest, Cheapest Way To Improve Water Quality

Through the CEDS Watershed Audit all existing activities are evaluated for compliance with Clean Water laws.  Due to many years of underfunded enforcement budgets, large volumes of pollution are entering our waterways from sources no longer in compliance with these laws.  A typical watershed is about 70 square miles in size and can be audited by a few volunteers or staff in no more than a week.  The Audit procedures are easy to learn and cost very little.  For further detail on Watershed Audits visitceds.org/audit.  To see if a compliance problem exists in your watershed call 1-800-773-4571 or simply reply to this message to schedule a no-cost initial Audit

 

—————–

 

Richard Klein

Community & Environmental Defense Services

811 Crystal Palace Court

Owings Mills, MD  21117

443-421-5964

 

New report that looks at penalties for pollution: are they enough to deter industry?

No Profit in Pollution: a comparison of key Chesapeake Bay state water pollution penalty policies

 

“Industries that discharge water pollution are required to abide by clean water laws and regulations that limit how much they can pollute the nation’s rivers, lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. If they exceed their limits or, fail to implement appropriate methods for controlling their pollution, they violate the law. Such violations should trigger appropriate economic sanctions to deter all regulated entities from committing future violations.  All too often, however, polluters may weigh decisions about whether and how much to pollute from a dollars-and-cents perspective only, comparing the costs of compliance with the penalties to which they may be subject for exceeding applicable discharge limits.”